Topical Discussion Meetings (TDM)

Type: Panel Forum

Convenors: Carina Alden, Philip Quinn, Krista Hammond

Speakers: Yana Maneva, Shawn Dahl, Katekile Shivambu, Kate Brand

Differences in analysis methods of CMEs can lead to a range of CME parameters which are used to predict the arrival time at Earth, model events, catalogue events, and can impact SEP model predictions. Many groups depend on these results, such as groups supporting human spaceflight missions and satellite operations, making it pertinent to understand the differences. This Topical Discussion Meeting (TDM) aims to identify gaps in methods for CME analysis (measurement techniques, source identification, modeling, differences in predicted arrival times) currently used by operational forecasting groups in an effort to provide feedback from operations to research. This TDM brings together a panel of invited forecasters from operational entities around the globe. We encourage other forecasting groups and the scientific community to participate in the discussion. Each group will have the opportunity to briefly present on current operational CME analysis methodologies and tools, gaps and challenges faced as forecasters, and what is needed for future forecasting capabilities. This session provides the opportunity for the audience to speak directly with forecasters working the desk.

Type: Panel Forum

Convenors: Tinatin Baratashvili, Stefaan Poedts, Michaela Brchnelova, Fan Zhang

Speakers: Jon Linker, Nishtha Sachdeva, Jasmina Magdalenic Zhukov, Dylan Kee

This TDM aims to bring together experts from different fields of computational modeling and observational methods in order to improve the accuracy and robustness of coronal modeling (and thus, by extension, also heliospheric modeling and space weather forecasting). Specifically, we aim to look at the topics that currently most significantly limit the performance of global coronal models, namely 1. the effects and importance of processing the input magnetogram data, 2. the thermodynamic boundary conditions and the importance of the start of the coronal model (upper chromosphere vs base of the corona), 3. the challenge of time-accurate modeling during solar maxima, and 4. the available observations for validating the coronal model. All these steps are necessary for accurate coronal modeling both in low corona and farther, near the outer coronal boundary near 0.1 AU, which is crucial for heliospheric modeling. However, the challenge lies in advancing the coronal model, yet sustaining efficiency to obtain the coronal model compatible for space weather forecasting. For this, correct assumptions have to be made, to include more physics in the domain, yet not increase the computational cost of the simulations significantly (5 hours wall-clock time on supercomputers). The insights from experienced coronal modelers are interesting, for constraining the accurate coronal model most efficiently.

Type: Service/Project Feedback

Convenors: Masha Kuznetsova, Mario Bisi, Suzy Bingham

Speakers: None

COSPAR International Space Weather Action Teams (ISWAT) initiative with more than 550 active members includes 62 Action Teams working via self-guided topical collaborations addressing challenges across the field of space weather. ISWAT initiative formed the backbone for the community-driven Space Weather Roadmap with a set of science papers coordinated by Action Team Leads and a set of review papers mirroring the ISWAT Cluster structure. The TDM will start with a scene setting introduction summarizing key Roadmap recommendations, that will be followed by open discussion on post-Roadmap ISWAT goals, proposals for new overarching activities, new action teams, and new campaigns. We will also discuss preparation for the ISWAT 2025 Working Meeting.

Type: Other

Convenors: Juha-Pekka Luntama, Andrew Monham, Francois-Xavier Bocquet, Jim Wild

Speakers: None

Space weather research, space climate and space weather services all depend on ensured access to ground based and spaceborne observation data, preferably through harmonised interfaces and with standardised data formats. Ground based space weather instruments include, for example, all-sky cameras, radars, magnetometers, GNSS stations, riometers and ionosondes. They provide specific information about the prevailing space weather and climate conditions at their respective locations, but collectively they also provide a global perspective capturing the spatial variation and the evolution of the conditions. Spaceborne instruments provide solar remote sensing observations that are not feasible from ground and in-situ observations of the space environment. Space weather instruments flown in current or future satellite missions include, for example, coronagraphs, heliospheric imagers, magnetographs, solar wind plasma analysers, magnetometers and radiation monitors.

This TDM will continue the successful discussions that have taken place during previous European Space Weather Weeks on the crucial topic of data access. The aim of the TDM is to collect user feedback on how the measures implement based on previous discussions have worked, what would be the next most urgent steps, long term objectives, and any other data access topics that may come up. An important aspect of this TDM is that both ground based and spaceborne observations are discussed together to identify common issues, synergies and to address the needs of the whole user and data provider community. Harmonisation of data and metadata formats, access to data repositories and access to legacy data from past missions are such topics. The discussion will also address the need to prepare for utilisation of new observation systems by early release of representative observation data based on simulations and similar observation systems. Finally, the discussion is foreseen to address long term planning and securing ground based and spaceborne observation in the future.

Type: Event impact

Convenors: Christine Verbeke, Maksym Peterenko

Speakers: Jack Wang

With the new generation of space weather and heliophysics models and coupled modeling frameworks continuing to grow in resolution and accuracy, data output of these models increases in size as well. As the model runs output routinely exceeding 2TB, many of the original tools, techniques, and services developed for analyzing, validating, and sharing of modeling results are nearing their limits. In this session, we encourage contributions from across the full field of space weather that highlight specific user needs, technology gaps, and practical solutions in support of the science enabled by the next generation of the heliophysics models

Type: Service/Project Feedback

Convenors: Melanie Heil, Mehdi Scoubeau, Sébastien Bourdarie

Speakers: None

ESA’s upcoming Space Weather Nanosat mission represents the first dedicated Space Weather mission to provide data for operational services. The data service is targeted to start in 2026 and will provide radiation data, ionospheric data as well as solar x-ray flux. Details of the measurements will be shared and discussed for optimisation within the instrument constraints. The main goal of the TDM is to receive feedback from data users on needs to prepare the data utilisation, such as data formats, access and measurement characteristics. Further upcoming missions, like the second funded nanosatellite mission, Aurora, a planned GTO mission for radiation belt nowcasts, and Vigil may also be part of the discussion.

Type: Service/Project Feedback

Convenors: Mamoru Ishii, David Jackson, Richard Marshall, Sergio Dasso

Speakers: None

It is essential to communicate with end users for improving space weather services. This topic became one of the top priorities in space weather communities, e.g., ISES and ISWCF. However, we still have some difficulties for close communications. We will present recent trials for improving the user engagements and discuss future plan.

Type: Other

Convenors: Rayan Imam, Stijn Calders, Maxime Grandin, Audrey Schillings

Speakers: None

E-SWAN, uniquely positioned at the intersection of scientific and operational space weather and space climate communities, faces unique challenges in defining its Diversity, Equality, and Inclusion (DE&I) statement due to its regional nature. The aim of this topical discussion meeting is to gather community feedback on the ongoing activities and advancements of the E-SWAN DE&I working group, and to present E-SWAN’s DE&I statements, which were the central focus of the working group’s endeavors in the previous year. Our emphasis is on the challenges encountered by the working group members in gathering feedback on DE&I aspects. We urge participants to actively contribute suggestions for potential revisions to the DE&I statements, ensuring they accurately reflect the diverse E-SWAN community and the values we aspire to uphold. We welcome audience with or without DE&I experience from both within and outside the space weather community to enhance the discussion with insights from various organizations and industries. The discussion will gather audience feedback on selected topics through online polls that will be activated during the TDM.

Type: Panel Forum

Convenors: Stefaan Poedts, Nicolas Wijsen, Zheyi Ding, Gang Li

Speakers: Nina Dresing, Mihir Desai, David Lario, Olga Malandraki, Rami Vainio

Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events represent a formidable challenge to the safety of space exploration and our space-based infrastructure. The accurate understanding and prediction of SEP events are paramount in minimizing their potentially hazardous impacts. The current solar cycle offers unique opportunities for studying SEP events. Observations from multiple spacecraft, including Solar Orbiter, Parker Solar Probe, BepiColombo, and STEREO, as well as missions near Earth and Mars, can significantly refine the inputs and constrain the outputs of data-driven SEP models, leading to the development of more accurate and reliable SEP forecasting models. In this TDM, we raise the discussion on the challenges in data-driven SEP models and focus on the following questions: 1) What are the significant challenges in developing and implementing data-driven models for SEP prediction? 2) Which physical parameters within these models can be effectively constrained through observations from multiple spacecraft? 3) How do realistic solar wind models influence the accuracy of SEP predictions? For instance, realistic shock information and magnetic connections should be considered.

Type: Other

Convenors: Jean Lilensten, Aurelie Marchaudon, Luciano Rodriguez, Anwesha Maharana

Speakers: None

In 2024, the French astrophysics and space physics community carried out an extensive survey on climate and ecological transitions, conducting many interviews, performing detailed carbon footprint assessments, and more. This is probably the most thorough study ever carried out on these issues within a single country, specifically in the context of research activities in space. The aim of this TDM is twofold: – share with the community the first outcomes of this survey, and in particular present the pathways towards more sustainable research; Provide an opportunity for ESWW participants to discuss and debate these outcomes, which are important for raising awareness of these challenging issues.

This TDM will be organised by the E-SWAN Sustainability Working Group, which aims at gathering feedback from the community in order to better propose future activities.

Type: Service/Project Feedback

Convenors: Jesse Andries, David Jackson, Nicole Vilmer

Speakers: None

Radio frequency (RF) spectrum protection is important and is already applied across many activities where safeguarding of observations or communications is required to carry out operational activities effectively. Space weather sensors that use the radio spectrum currently do not have any regulatory protection. This is a critical omission, given that operational space weather services rely heavily on observations made in different parts of the radio spectrum.

Global coordination of spectrum use is organised internationally by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The ITU Radio Regulations (RRs) specify the allocation of different services to specific frequency bands and the associated technical criteria and regulatory conditions, as well as, when needed, procedures for international coordination to avoid or mitigate interference issues beyond national borders. The RRs are updated about every four years at the World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC). Excellent progress was made at the recent WRC-2023 which provided space weather with an initial recognition in the RRs, although no frequency bands have yet been allocated to the new service. It was agreed to further study 6 selected bands (mostly used for riometers and solar flux measurements), potentially leading to approval of allocations and associated protection criteria at WRC-2027.

For many people involved in space weather, this work is progressing slowly and even under the radar. Thus, the first aim of the TDM is to inform attendees at ESWW about the RF protection work and to seek their feedback. A further aim is to engage the community in assisting in the studies that are required to be performed leading up to WRC-2027, and in gaining support of national radiocommunication authorities for the intended allocations. In order to make progress, the bands selected for such studies are limited in number, cover quite narrow frequency bands, concern passive rather than active sensors, and are restricted to instruments already widely used in operational space weather activities. Regulation of the 6 selected bands may not be sufficient to fully protect these activities, and therefore a final aim of the TDM shall be to discuss how space weather RF protection may be extended to other instruments and bands beyond WRC-2027.

Type: Service/Project Feedback

Convenors: Vincent Maget, Alexi Glover, Francois-Xavier Bocquet, Mark Dierckxsens

Speakers: None

Through the ESA SSA and S2P programs, many prototypes and pre-operational products have been developed and displayed on the ESA Space Weather Service Network portal. They include a wide range of data from solar activity to the near-Earth space environment, the Earth’s atmosphere and the Earth’s ground itself, providing information for example on radiation belts, activity in specific regions, geomagnetic indices, and so forth. Their main purpose is to better answer to space-born users interested in Space Weather activity and related effects. These developments often use different frameworks with specific inputs/outputs while providing APIs to simplify their extended use. Nevertheless, the interoperability between them as well as their usefulness to the computation of other products are often unknown. Indeed solar activity products are of interest when forecasting geomagnetic activity as well as dynamics of the ring current, radiation belts and ionospheric disturbances. We propose in this session to open the discussion on the different possibilities of linking products together in order to improve the overall accuracy and operability of these recently developed Space Weather products. All contributions regarding recent products developments, lessons-learned on the availability of required inputs, as well as potentiality of products forecast for other ones are welcome.

Type: Panel Forum

Convenors: Alexi Glover, Quentin Verspieren, Sara Dalledonne

Speakers: Juha-Pekka Luntama (TBC)

As pre-operational service provision in the European context reaches maturity and efforts are underway to explore possible future operational service governance models, this session aims to explore the needs, opportunities and challenges for the space weather community ahead. Starting from an interrogation of the key differences between pre-operational and operational provision while maintaining a focus on end user needs, this TDM will reflect on operational governance models already established in related domains such as natural hazard management, seeking to identify lessons learned and good practices which may help inform future structuring of the space weather domain in Europe to include a strong operational component. Roles and responsibilities of different contributors including the academic community and commercial industry will be discussed in the frame of enabling transition from scientific to operations-ready assets along with information delivery to impacted users. The space weather community is encouraged to share their views towards a successful future governance model building on the wealth of expertise and assets available in Europe while supporting both future academic and commercial growth. The TDM will take the form of a panel discussion with experts and stakeholders, supported by the use of interactive polling tools. A further online questionnaire will be circulated to the community for comment in order to initiate an active discussion on key topics in advance of the conference.

Type: Other

Convenors: Veronika Haberle, Balazs Asztalos, Yuri Shprits

Speakers: None

At the European Space Weather Week 2023, the Working Group User-Engagement within E-SWAN kicked-off by organising TDM 10 – Getting the Space Weather and Space Climate (SWSC) Stakeholder Community Connected – Let’s build the ecosystem together! During this meeting several end-users presented their SWSC use-cases, followed by a discussion on the needs for SWSC end-users. Two key needs were identified: the creation of comprehensive databases, covering both scientific and knowledge-based information, and the improvement of connecting end-users with existing SWSC services. This TDM specifically addresses the latter by exploring strategies to enhance the discoverability of SWSC services for related SWSC end-user groups. Similar to last year’s set-up, this TDM is divided into two parts. In the first part, a handful of already available SWSC services are introduced and explained.

The second part of the TDM foresees an interactive discussion among the attendees during which SWSC services and end-users get the floor to exchange their views and needs. The goals of the discussion include answering the following questions 1) How can end-users find and reach existing services? 2) How can existing service providers successfully reach out to end-users? 3) Are there SWSC service gaps that end-users are missing? 4) How can we, within the User Engagement Working Group of E-SWAN, best facilitate the matching between end-users and services? In essence, this TDM aims to break down barriers, bringing end-users and services together for a stronger, more efficient Space Weather and Space Climate ecosystem. This discussion meeting is open to all SWSC stakeholders with a focus on end-users and service providers, including those from industry (including, but not limited to, satellite, navigation, communication, ground infrastructure, precision drilling, insurance, aviation, pipelines), research (scientists, data providers, modelers) and government institutions.

Your participation is highly valued!

Type: Service/Project Feedback

Convenors: Brent Gordon, Bill Murtagh, Dan Pechkis

Speakers: None

NOAA and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy are actively seeking input, both in the US and internationally, on proposed changes to the NOAA Space weather scales. By November 2024, it is anticipated that most input will be received and processed. This session provides an opportunity to discuss consensus results and the general direction this project will take toward implementation.

Type: Other

Convenors: Philip Quinn, Kathryn Whitman, KD Leka, Carina Alden

Speakers: None

This TDM serves as the next steps in the effort to validate SEP models. So far, a series of challenges were hosted at the SEPVAL working meetings. Model developers provided predictions for sets of SEP events and non-events, results from the SPHINX validation framework were discussed, and reports were sent to the model developers. This effort is now at the point where the validation results can guide actions for developers to improve their models. The following points will be discussed. What aspects of the model performance need improvement, and how can these improvements be made? What predictive approaches are working well, and which is the current state-of-the-art? Are the validation metrics accurately capturing all aspects of model performance?